New Haven Public School District
Grade 9 

 Core Activities
    Air Quality Index(AQI) - Calculationand Communication
    Concentration
    Air PollutionAround the World
    Alternative Fuels
    Steps You Can Take

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concentration PDF
  Student Worksheet
What can air pollution affect?

Where does the air pollution come from?
Air pollution comes from several sources. However cars, trucks, buses, boats, planes and trains are considered the largest contributors to poor air quality and produce millions of pounds of pollutants every day.

What can increased levels of ground level ozone or particulates affect?
  • Aggravate asthma and other medical conditions;
  • Decrease visibility; and
  • Injure or kill vegetation.

The increase in the concentration of air pollutants will have an increasingly significant impact on human health, vegetation and visibility.

1) Select one Connecticut city from the list below and answer the questions on the Student Worksheet.

Bridgeport, Connecticut

Danbury, Connecticut

Hartford, Connecticut

New Haven, Connecticut

New London - Groton, Connecticut

Mohawk Mountain, Cornwall, Connecticut

Litchfield County Particle Pollution


Extension
Hands-on activity
pH measures the relative acidity of the water on a scale of 0-14. A pH level of 7.0 is considered neutral. Pure water has a pH of 7.0. Water with a pH level less than 7.0 is considered to be acidic. Normal rain is slightly acidic, with a pH of about 5.5. Water with a pH greater than 7.0 is considered to be basic or alkaline. As of the year 2000, the most acidic rain falling in the U.S. had a pH of about 4.3.

  1. Part 1: Soil
    1. Fill a graduated cylinder with 100 ml of vinegar (or another solution with a pH of 4.0) Pour the 100 ml of vinegar into a spray bottle. Place 1500 ml of soil (6 cups) into a 2 quart mixing bowl. Measure the pH of the soil and record (*test kits vary; this test may take up to 10 minutes to get results). Spray the solution on the bowl of soil for 10 seconds. Let stand for 30 seconds. Measure the amount of vinegar/solution used and record. Measure the pH of the soil again and record (*test kits vary; this test may take up to 10 minutes to get results).
    2. Answer the following questions:
      • Was there a difference in the pH level? If so, what was it? What do you think would happen to the pH level of the water if you sprayed for 30 seconds? 1 minute?
      • How do you think acid rain affects the pH of soil in fields and forests?

    *NOTE: The soil test can take up to 10 minutes for the results. You might want to complete both soil tests, then complete Part 2 while you are waiting for the results.
     

    Part 2: Water
    1. Fill a graduated cylinder with 100 ml of vinegar (or another solution with a pH of 4.0) Pour the 100 ml of vinegar into a spray bottle. Place 1500 ml of water (6 cups) into a 2 quart mixing bowl. Measure the pH of the water and record. Spray the solution on the bowl of water for 10 seconds. Let stand for 30 seconds. Measure the amount of vinegar/solution used and record. Measure the pH of the water again and record.
    2. Answer the following questions:
      • Was there a difference in the pH level? If so, what was it? What do you think would happen to the pH level of the water if you sprayed for 30 seconds? 1 minute?
      • How do you think acid rain affects the pH in lakes, rivers and streams?

  2. Part 3: Vegetation
    1. Obtain 3 fresh, green leaves from the same tree or plant. Tape one leaf (control leaf) to a piece of white paper, label, and place in a dry, safe location. Spray one leaf all over with the vinegar/solution. Tape it next to the control leaf on the white piece of paper and label.
      • Are there any immediate effects to the leaf?
      Place the leaf next to your control leaf overnight in the classroom.
      • What does the leaf look like the next day?
      Spray a third leaf all over with the vinegar/solution 6 times in a day, place it next to the other leaves and leave overnight.
    2. Answer the following questions:
      • What does the leaf look like the next day?
      • How do you think acid rain affects trees and other plants?



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